EMERGENCY! CPGC TREES MARKED FOR DESTRUCTION

CITY TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING TONIGHT AND SATURDAY! COME

 

Oct 12, 2017 — Trees in City Park Golf Course from Colorado Blvd. to York St. are banded with yellow tape, marked for imminent death ( within the next few days)
You can help to stop this destruction. The city is holding public meeting tonight, Thursday, and Saturday morning to hear what YOU have to say about their plans to destroy historic City Park Golf Course and hundreds of trees. PLEASE SHOW UP. BE VOCAL. RALLY YOUR FRIENDS. DON”T BE SILENCED.

CLICK HERE FOR MEETING DETAILS:
http://mailchi.mp/20de8794e99b/emergency-cpgc-trees-marked-for-destruction-city-to-hold-public-meeting-tonight-and-saturday-come

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Historic Denver Feedback on Cultural Landscape Report for City Park Golf Course

1)      The report generally provides a solid overview of the course and its development, and the photographs and maps are useful visual aids.  While the document would have been more helpful at an earlier stage, it should still be useful in informing design decisions.

2)      We concur with the proposed period of significance for the reasons documented in the CLR and because the proposal is reasonably consistent with the proposed period of significance for the remainder of City Park, which is currently undergoing a master planning process.  We also concur that the course currently exhibits good integrity.

3)      The underlying premise of the report seems to be that the Golf Course has changed overtime.  That is clearly true, however, the core foundational elements of the Course have not changed substantially (topography, views, spatial relationships, circulation patterns).  Additionally, the Course had taken on its current state, more or less, by the mid-1960s and so most of the changes to landscape style and vegetation should be considered contributing to the historic character as we now know it.  Efforts should therefore be made to preserve, honor or reinforce relationships and attributes that date to the period of significance.  This includes the foundational elements noted above, but also the key plantings and the planting patterns, that date to the period of significance.

4)      There remains some incomplete thinking related to the trees and defining their significance.  Emphasis has been placed on the age of trees alone- rather than on understanding which planting patterns have significance, even if they are less evident today.  While certainly preserving the legacy/champion trees is critical, understanding the patterns during the period of significance could guide the designers in choices about where to re-establish those patterns, what kinds of trees to plant, etc.

5)      Justification is made for moving the clubhouse based on previous conversations about moving it in the 1940s and 1990s, but preservation practice would say that simply because something was previously discussed or even designed, if it wasn’t built it’s not “historic,” so using those previous conversations as an argument to support the move doesn’t really work.  There should be further discussion of how the move affects other contributing features, and whether those attributes can be preserved even if the club house moves.

6)      The views are defined as significant both into and out of the course, so the idea that buildings need to be low, and not dominant, is very important not only to the views but also to the sense of vastness that is repeatedly noted as a significant characteristic.

 

logo for email signatureAnnie Robb Levinsky

Executive Director

Historic Denver, Inc 

1420 Ogden St.

Denver, CO 80218

303-534-5288 ext. 1

www.historicdenver.org

 

Are you a member?  Join today at www.historicdenver.org.

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ANOTHER NAIL IN THE I 70/ PLATTE TO PARK HILL COFFIN?

Contact: Aaron Goldhamer

Tel.: 303.534.0401

Email: agoldhamer@keatingwagner.com

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Zeppelin Plaintiffs Move to Enjoin I-70 Widening Project

 Denver, CO

September 18, 2017

 

On Friday, a group of Denver citizens—including developer Kyle Zeppelin—filed a motion in Federal court to enjoin the Colorado Department of Transportation (“CDOT”) from proceeding with its controversial plan to expand I-70 through Denver.  If the motion is successful it could bring a halt to the highway project, which has been derided by critics as an expensive and backwards-thinking boondoggle that threatens the health of predominantly low-income and Latino neighborhoods in north Denver.

 CDOT and the Federal Highway Administration’s (“FHWA”) alleged failure to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”) is the basis for the sought injunction.  Namely, the plaintiffs assert that CDOT and the FHWA are proceeding with the I-70 project without two areas of required study: (1) a failure to study the effect on human health of the project in light of the disturbance of toxic materials present in the Superfund site where the project is located, and (2) a failure to study the environmental and other impacts of the City of Denver and CDOT’s joint proposed “Platte to Park Hill” drainage project, which the plaintiffs allege is designed to protect the proposed subgrade lowering of I-70.

 The EPA has determined that part of the I-70 construction area contains conditions that “present a threat to public health and environment[,]” and that “excavation of these metal contaminated soils pose the threat of additional releases of these hazardous substances to the environment.”  Nevertheless, CDOT did not analyze how the disturbance or spread of these contaminants may actually impact human health and the environment before deciding to proceed with the I-70 project, the plaintiffs allege.

 The Platte to Park Hill project is the City of Denver and CDOT’s joint massive $300M drainage project planned for north Denver.  CDOT is paying up to $60M toward this project.  “Under NEPA, CDOT and the FHWA were required to study the Platte to Park Hill project, because it is connected to the I-70 project.  They did not do so, in violation of federal law,” said Aaron Goldhamer, an attorney at the law firm Keating Wagner Polidori Free, P.C., that is representing the plaintiffs. 

 Goldhamer also represented various Denver residents in a suit against the City of Denver that was tried to a state court judge in August.  That case alleged that the portion of the Platte to Park Hill project planned for City Park Golf Course—which is designated parkland—was unlawful under the Denver Charter because the project constituted highway construction and drainage support, which runs afoul of the Denver Charter’s restriction of parkland to “park purposes.”  That case still awaits determination.

 Additional plaintiffs to the federal case include Brad Evans, Christine O’Connor, Kimberly Morse, Jacqueline Lansing, and Janet Feder.  Melissa Hailey of Keating Wagner and Jay Tuchton of the Tutchton Law Office also represent these plaintiffs.  “Melissa Hailey is really the brains behind this operation, and is pulling the laboring oar,” Goldhamer said of Hailey, a former WildEarth Guardians attorney.

 The plaintiffs expect that their requested injunction will be determined no later than early 2018, before CDOT is scheduled to begin construction.  CDOT and the FHWA will have an opportunity to respond to the plaintiffs’ motion, and an injunction hearing is possible.  If the injunction is granted, it would bode well for a final determination that CDOT would have to reissue an Environmental Impact Study before proceeding with the I-70 project, as “likelihood of success on the merits” is an important factor in obtaining injunctive relief.  Likewise, if the injunction is granted, CDOT may not be able to help pay for the Platte to Park Hill project.  If that happens, Goldhamer thinks “the City might scrap their Platte to Park Hill project.  After all, they did not have any plan for it in Denver’s 2014 Storm Drainage Master Plan, before CDOT apparently realized they needed to account for more drainage issues and talked Denver into helping them out.”

 Goldhamer’s City Park Golf Course case uncovered a document that Denver had fought to keep secret: a 2014 Montclair Creek Drainage Feasibility Evaluation, which clarified the following in writing:

 CDOT’s Project Manager, Keith Stefanik[,] has confirmed from his management team that CDOT cannot include any of the Montclair Creek open channel projects [now known as Platte to Park Hill] in their design/build contract for the I-70 PCL project. To amend their Environmental Impact Study (EIS) to include an open channel option is such a large change in scope that they would have to start their NEPA EIS process essentially over again. It has taken them two years to get to the point of where they are ready to submit their supplemental package, and they are unwilling to jeopardize their progress on the EIS for the I-70 PCL.

 NEPA requirements will activate if we use federal funding. If any of the Montclair Creek projects have to undergo a NEPA process, we understand from CDOT’s NEPA Project Manager, Kirk Webb, that this process would take a minimum of 2 to 3 years. Based on the I-70 PCL schedule, these projects are not a viable option for the City and County of Denver to pursue. It is understood if we are able to secure non-Federal funding for these project [sic], then we would not have to undergo a NEPA process.

 In addition to the City Park Golf Course case, additional litigation concerning I-70—both in the District of Columbia and in Colorado Federal court—remains pending.  A case filed in Colorado by the Sierra Club and neighborhood groups has been consolidated with the Zeppelin plaintiffs’ matter for purposes of case management.

 The Zeppelin plaintiffs’ motion for the injunction is attached.  Additional exhibits and pleadings in the case are available from the Federal District Court for the District of Colorado or upon request to the contact listed above.

Aaron D. Goldhamer | Attorney at Law

Keating Wagner Polidori Free, P.C.

1290 Broadway, Suite 600

Denver, CO  80203

303.534.0401 Main

ATTACHMENT HERE

motion.for.stay

303.534.8333 Fax

www.keatingwagner.com

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Clayton Early Learning – Park Hill Golf Course Community Forum

Please join Clayton Early Learning for Community Forum #3 to continue the community discussion regarding the future of Park Hill Golf Course. The meeting will take place from 7PM-8PM on Thursday September 21, 2017 on the Clayton Campus in the Administration Building. The campus is located at 3801 Martin Luther King Boulevard (Colorado Blvd/Martin Luther King Blvd.) Questions? Please contact Liz Adams ladams@crlassociates.com

This raises several questions:

Can the City release a perpetual Conservation Easement granted to the City for fair value? Even if it can, should it?

What is the value of the 25-are Inundation Easement?

What compensation is the City providing Clayton in exchange for the Inundation Easement?

What is the value of the Conservation Easement?

What is the value of the zoning?

How did they arrive at these values?

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A Message From Brad Evans, Ditch The Ditch

Hello Friends,

Over the last 30 days, we’ve seen significant progress Ditching The Ditch. We’ve put CDOT, the City of Denver, and their boondoggle ditch project on the ropes. The tide has turned, and we are seeing a BIG results! We need your help, we’ve received a $6000 matching dollar challenge, and we can double it with your help! https://www.gofundme.com/film-campaign

With four lawsuits pending against this project, community outcry has been tremendous. The road to victory, however, is still a long one. While these legal disputes continue to wind their way through the courts, now is the time to fortify the battle on another vital front; the court of public opinion. To this end, we are working with a film maker to create 3 videos for use on social media. The film maker is generously donating his time to work on these films. Remaining costs will run $20,000 and we NEED to cover that.
We would like to thank Kayvan Khalatbari for connecting us with this film maker, as that alone has saved us thousands of dollars. These kinds of collaborative efforts show why education is so important. The I-70 Ditch is an affront to humanity, and people across the country want to join the fight. In order for them to do that, we have to tell them where the fight is and how.
Our public education efforts so far, have led to national coverage in the New York Times, The Nation, The Guardian, and City Lab. National press leads to more funding and critical pressure from more influential players, which the mayor and governor are particularly vulnerable to.
To continue our work in funding the lawsuits and the public education efforts, we are asking you to make another tax deductible contribution to Ditch the Ditch. Your contributions make certain we stop the Ditch and hold politicians accountable to their real constituents, the people. We are up against wasteful government, crony capitalism, and corruption in the highest order.
Ten contributions of $1,000 each, funds our video production. Every dollar helps us reach our goal, and helps us keep this out of control government accountable. We NEED a minimum of $3,200 before September 10th to start shooting, the day we begin filming. Everyone who contributes $1,000 or more, will receive an invitation to attend the filming.
Additionally we’re hosting a fundraiser on Sept 12th, all funds raised for this will be met with the above mentioned match. Hope you can attend! http://tinyurl.com/y9hnkrfx
Help us get the word out!

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NO VERDICT YET/ CITY TO “DONATE” PARK LAND TO DEVELOPER?

CITY PARK FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS

Sep 7, 2017

WE WILL LET YOU KNOW AS SOON AS WE HAVE A VERDICT ON OUR LAWSUIT TO SAVE HISTORIC CPGC FROM DESTRUCTION

A BAD PRECEDENT? DENVER PARKS WANTS TO “SWAP” A PUBLIC PARK FOR A “PRIVATE” PLAZA. COME & LET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD

The city proposes to give a piece of publicly owned property that was supposed to be a green, public park…. to a private
developer. Such a deal for whom?

This property is located on the 2800 block of Fairfax.
Denver Parks & Recreation told Park Hill residents that this property would be made into a public park.
Now the city ( Denver Parks and Recreation) proposes to hand it over to a private developer in the form of a “LAND SWAP”.
City Councilman Chris Herndon appears to be facilitating this swap.

Instead of a public park, residents would get a cement plaza embedded in a big mixed use development across the street from the land in question……. in exchange for this city owned property.

This is the same big private development that Councilman Chris Herndon was asked to keep secret from his constituents, by the developer, until the land acquisition was complete. And Councilman Herndon did just that. Now, is he in favor of donating our precious park land to the same developer AT A LOSS TO THE CITY?

The private developer would maintain the “park” and provide “security”. We understand that the developer would also have first right on utilization of the “park”.

Does this sound like a public park to you? Would all neighbors be welcome in this upscale development with restaurants and retail? Could you have a barbeque or a family reunion in this “park”?

DOES THIS SOUND FISHY TO YOU?

ACTION: Greater Park Hill Community will discuss this proposal at their meeting tonight:
Thursday, September 7
6:30 PM
Greater Park Hill Community Center,
2823 Fairfax St. 880207
Park Hill Community neighbors and the City of Denver Dept of Parks and Recreation ( Scott Gilmore) will be giving presentations.
We need your voice.

The $64 question. Will Denver City Councilman Chris Herndon attend?
Stay tuned.

QUASI PUBLIC, PARK HILL GOLF COURSE TO CLOSE SOON. INC WANTS CITY TO ACQUIRE IT FOR PUBLIC PARK LAND. ARE MURKY BACKROOM DEALS GOING ON OUT OF PUBLIC VIEW?

 

READ MORE: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3tj3PB9uPWZdEsxQWtqbzJtNm8/view?usp=sharing

ACTION: PLEASE COME , MEET FRIENDS , HAVE FUN PARK HILL STREET FAIR Come to: CITY PARK FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS TABLE ( LOOK FOR THE 1971 VW CAMPER POP TOP)

Sunday, September 10
11:00 – 5PM
FOREST AVE. PARKWAY
MORE DETAILS: http://www.parkhillhometour.org/street-fair/


Denver Parks seem to be under attack from our own Department of Parks and Recreation, Denver City Council and the Mayor.
The people literally have no voice or vote in the destiny of our parks.
The Director of Denver Parks and Recreation, Happy Haynes, a political appointee who serves at the pleasure of Mayor Michael Hancock ,ALONE, now decides what is a park use.
Huge Music Festivals, drainage projects, incinerators, a Starbucks or a MacDonalds … Happy can rule that they are all park uses.

You don’t get to vote on it and neither does your City Council Representative. Denver’s 2010 Zoning Law overhaul gave the Mayor complete control over the destiny of Denver’s parks.

Were you snoozing when that law passed?

We need to be alert and let our voices be heard… loud and clear.
Citizens of Denver want to have a voice in their own destiny and have a say in what happens to our public lands before they aren’t public anymore.

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