Category Archives: featured

UPDATE: LAW SUIT TO SAVE HISTORIC CITY PARK GOLF COURSE FROM DESTRUCTION

By Bridget Walsh, CPFAN Member

The city of Denver wants to install one large part of a huge, industrial, storm water drain, Platte to Park Hill (P2PH), in historic .City Park Golf Course (CPGC) The drain is designed to keep the controversial expansion and lowering  of Highway I 70 , from flooding. It could also save the developers around the Western Stock Show much of the cost of doing their own water mitigation. P2PH could also facilitate  the construction of Olympic Village 2026, a plan that seems to have been hatched by Denver elites, the Mayor and the Governor. Has anyone asked you?

Both the highway expansion and the drain are destructive, old fashioned infrastructure  “solutions” that many say, will not serve Denver residents well as we face new age challenges. Both of these projects, I 70 and the drain,  seem to be  robbing Colorado taxpayers of billions of dollars that are sorely needed all over Colorado, for progressive, green solutions to real challenges such as climate change, water conservation, hotter temperatures, water wars, severe weather, dirty air, soil and water, etc.

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Protestors try building support to stop I-70 expansion

June 18, 2017, by

Fox/Channel 2 News Jun 18, 2017

Original Article Found Here

DENVER — We’ve been talking about expanding I-70 through the metro for nearly 15 years. And still, opposition to it stands strong–literally.

Dozens of folks came out to continue fighting the I-70 Expansion project they say is too expensive and won’t do much to reduce traffic congestion on Sunday.

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) built the section of I-70 in the 1960’s. And now, CDOT will rebuild what’s considered the worst-rated bridge starting early next year.

That is, unless, a group with their “Ditch the Ditch” signs, can halt the highway.

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Process for obtaining permits for events at Denver parks questioned

DENVER — After the denial of permits for Denver’s 420 Rally, questions are being raised about how permits are granted to organizations holding events in public parks.

Some people believe there should be a more vigorous public discussion before the city gives event organizers a green light.

The smattering of homes near the Overland Golf Course Park is usually a quiet neighborhood.

But it won’t be that way for several weeks in the fall of 2018 if the city approves a permit for a concert and art show that could temporarily shut down the course.

Helene Orr, who lives across the street said, “When you’re talking 50,000 to 70,000 people per day for three days your talking three weeks of major construction … and we’re talking stages that are two and three stories high. This is a major major thing happening.”

Orr said there was never a public notice that a company had applied to hold the event here.

“The city feels like they have the right to use or misuse for whatever they want to do. And combine with a neighborhood that doesn’t have a lot of lawyers and architects that live there to fight it,” she said.

“It’s not fair,” Tom Morris said.

Morris has been fighting to change the way the city of Denver approves permits for events at public parks.

“We need to have an organized expectable process where we’re guaranteed to be notified if there is going to be a change in the use of the park and time to think about it and opportunities to participate with public discussion,” Morris said.

The city’s Parks and Rec Department told us organizations currently only need to apply for a permit.

No public hearings are necessary.

That’s not good enough according to Morris.

“I have been asking to zone the parks because we apply zoning to every other scrap of land in the city and not our most valuable land which is these parks.”

The city has not yet approved the concert and show at Overland.

A parks spokesman said it wants to make sure the venue is ready to handle the noise, trash and parking.

Still, some who live here are worried there will be problems.

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Reinforcements Are Coming in the Grassroots Fight Against I-70 Expansion

 

Published in Denver Streets Blog

ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE

The Center for Health, Environment, and Justice has joined the Elyria Swansea Neighborhood Association in the fight against a wider I-70, granting $5,000 to the cause.

CHEJ is based in Falls Church, Virginia, but has national reach. Environmental health activist Lois Marie Gibbs founded the organization after a successful campaign to get New York state to clean up the Love Canal site in the 1970s. The state had insisted for years that an industrial dumping ground in Niagara Falls had nothing to do with elevated rates of childhood illness and birth defects. Gibbs’ led the fight to protect people from pollutants at Love Canal and became known as the “Mother of Superfund,” the federal program for remediating toxic sites.

The new grant won’t fund litigation against the I-70 project — though legal action is still likely — but will rather amplify the message of Denverites already fighting the project.

“Local residents are the most qualified environmental police CHEJ knows,” Gibbs said in a statement.

The Colorado Department of Transportation’s plan to push more cars through the mostly Latino, low-income neighborhoods of Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea, requires digging a 40-foot ditch. To protect that ditch from flooding, the Hancock administration and Denver City Council made a deal with CDOT: They put Denver taxpayers on the hook for widening I-70 in exchange for flood protection work.

Nearby residents are concerned about the environmental implications of both projects. In addition to the traffic and pollution that come from widening a highway, there’s toxic soil — rife with lead and arsenic — at the site of the outfall project, which is part of a federal Superfund site [PDF]. All this in the most polluted populated area in the United States.

“We just don’t have faith that CDOT, the city, or the [Environmental Protection Agency] has followed required procedures, or that they’ll follow the rules in the future,” ESNA President Drew Dutcher told Streetsblog.

Feeding that distrust, Dutcher said, is the fact that CDOT decided against a prior version of the I-70 ditch because of “unacceptable effects on aquatic and ecological resources and increased potential for encountering contaminated groundwater or soils,” according to a 2008 environmental impact statement (page 3-17). He wants to know what’s changed.

The city is trying to “control the public image” of the projects, Dutcher said, and the grant will counteract that by boosting the research and outreach efforts of north Denver residents.

“We really feel that we’re being spoon-fed information by the city and EPA, and we need resources to just look at all the work that’s being done, how it’s being monitored, what are the possible hazards,” Dutcher said. “So it’s really just kind of a citizen-led effort to understand everything that’s going on.”

ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE

 

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A Denver native who’s not ready to say goodbye to City Park Golf Course as he knows it

DENVER – Driving around town you might have seen some “Ditch the Ditch” signs in people’s yards. Long story short, it all has to do with the expansion of I-70 – and a citywide construction project in Denver to reshape the storm drainage system.

RELATED: I-70 expansion given the green light despite neighborhood objections

The city will tell you the two aren’t connected. The critics say they are. That’s not what this story is about.

Part of that drainage project would build a huge retention pond at City Park Golf course. That means the course will close at the end of this year, and the whole thing will be redesigned. A brand new golf course will open in 2019, but one Andy Lyford is a Denver native with a strong opinion on that.

“I grew up playing City Park Golf Course. It’s one of my happiest places on Earth … It’s in the middle of the city. It has the best views of the city … It’s suffocating. I guess that’s the word I would use because we’re Western people. We’re Colorado people. None of us were originally from here, so we want people to come here. We welcome it, but a lot of times, we feel that the traditions and things that we love are being trampled on. I’m almost 50, but it seems like I’ve seen the amount of growth that most people would see over the course of 100 years…”

Andy was emotional describing what growing up on the course has meant to him. You can hear from Andy in the video above.

The city says this drainage project is necessary to relieve flooding problems in neighborhoods. A group is suing the city over the City Park plan, claiming the city is trying to illegally convert the course into non-park use land

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The Value of Open Space To A City

 

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News About Other Parks

DENVER WANTS TO USE HISTORIC OVERLAND GOLF COURSE AS A VENUE FOR A 3 DAY , MULTI STAGE MUSIC FESTIVAL .
30,000+ PEOPLE A DAY.
Take a 1 minute action now.

Click here to sign the petition to save Overland Golf Course and get more information.
Click here to read neighborhood group’s report.

UPDATE!!!

 

By Jeff Todd

DENVER (CBS4)– Despite more opposition than support, the City of Denver is moving forward with plans for a massive music festival at the historic Overland Park Golf Course.

The city is now working on a multi-year contract with the promoter Superfly, which has put on similar events in San Francisco and Tennessee, for a festival that would bring crowds between 30,000 to 60,000 people per day.

Since public meeting started earlier this year, city officials have said if the nearby neighborhoods didn’t support the festival then it wouldn’t happen.

“What I really feel is betrayed I feel utterly betrayed, by the city, by my councilperson and by my neighborhood association,” said Helene Orr, who lives across the street from the golf course. “First of all it’s a golf course not a concert venue there’s absolutely no infrastructure to support it, there’s no parking there’s no nothing.”

Orr spent the past few months gathering nearly 500 signatures opposed to the project.

The Parks Department released statistics associated with an online survey and other public engagement.

Orr spent the past few months gathering nearly 500 signatures opposed to the project.

The Parks Department released statistics associated with an online survey and other public engagement.

The community process highlighted the values, interests and concerns of a diverse community,” said Happy Haynes, Executive Director of Denver Parks and Recreation in a statement. “In the next stage of the process, our commitment is to fulfill the guidelines we set forth during the community input process. We are confident that we can reach an agreement that accomplishes that goal. We pledge to hold the event organizers accountable to protecting that which is valuable to our city, its residents and neighborhoods.”

“It was kind of a done deal from the get go and in fact they weren’t ever really interested in getting neighborhood approval. In my view it’s really been a process of manufacturing consent it’s not about building consensus or finding out if people really, really want it,” Orr said.

There’s no timeline for completing the contract but it’s expected to be finalized in the summer or fall and then head to the city council for final approval.

SURVEY RELEASED BY PARKS AND RECS

data-summary_potential-music-festival

SEE CITY SURVEY HERE

 

 

 

 



Park Hill Golf Course
A NEW PARK FOR DENVER?

The Clayton Trust owns Park Hill Golf Course. They make an income of $700,000 a year from a soon to expire lease with a golf management company. The lease will not be renewed. The Trust is wondering what to do with the land.  Inter Neighborhood Cooperative (INC) thinks that Denver should buy it and use it for a park and passed a resolution at their last Delegate meeting to urge the City to purchase it with GO Bonds. Go Here to see the resolution.  It is invaluable open land that could be preserved for future generations.
You might want to weigh in with an email to  Happy Haynes , director of Denver Parks and Recreation.

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